Corridors

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It is the corridor between two rows of columns. Many studies indicate that al-Aqsa mosque had three corridors in the past, extended along the eastern, Northern and Western walls of the mosque, while today there are only two corridors, the Western and the Northern. The corridors served as paved and shaded corridors that facilitate the movement of worshipers from the gates to the mosque’s facilities.

1) The Western Corridor

This corridor was built during the Mamluk era between 707-737 AH/1307-1336 AC. It consists of stone columns that are topped with arched ceilings and have a number of overlapping hallways. The corridor is paved with stone floors that are slightly higher than the rest of Al-Aqsa’s courtyards. In the past, the western corridor’s hallways were used for scholarly gatherings.

2) The Northern Corridor

King Issa Al-Moatham built the oldest section of the northern corridor in 610 AH/1213 AC, extending to the west from the Gate of Darkness. An inscription can be found on this section of the corridor documenting the name of its founder and the year of its construction. The rest of the corridor was built during various Islamic eras. A number of schools were built over the corridor: Al-Aminiyah School, Al-Asa’rdiyah School, Al Farisyah School, Al-Malakiyah School, and Al-Sabibyah School. The corridor is made of huge stone columns that are topped with arched ceilings and has overlapping vaults and hallways. It is paved with stone floors that are slightly higher than the rest of Al-Aqsa’s courtyards. During the Ottoman era the corridor was sealed using stone partitions and turned into a lodge for poor pilgrims.